Saturday 3/26 only – Kindle deals on Neil Gaiman, Rick Riordan and John Scalzi

NeverwhereETA: As of Sunday morning, Neverwhere and Old Man’s War are still on sale.  Also, Happy Easter to everyone who celebrates!

Amazon is trying to bankrupt me. It’s the only explanation. But hey, if I go, you go, too.  😉

Deal #1 – Neil Gaiman’s Neverwhere, all 400 pages of the author’s preferred text, is just $1.99.

 

 

The Last OlympianDeal #2 – Rick Riordan’s The Last Olympian, book five in the Percy Jackson series, is also $1.99.

 

 

 

Old Man's WarDeal #3 – John Scalzi’s Old Man’s War is $2.99.

 

 

 

Flowers for AlgernonDeal #4Flowers for Algernon, the classic by Daniel Keyes, is $1.99.

Get three freebies, including my newest story, from Phoenix Pick and Galaxy’s Edge

Galaxy's Edge, Issue 19, March of 2016
Galaxy’s Edge, Issue 19, March of 2016

My newest story is live in Issue 19 of Galaxy’s Edge.

Shattered Vessels, co-written with the talented Robert B Finegold, is a tale of love and loss, adventure and mysticism, and one too many knife fights.  It will take you from ancient Assyria to the Pyrenees to modern day San Francisco.

The issue is free to read until the next issue goes live (at which point the link I’ve included will take you to Issue 20 or beyond).

If you enjoy Galaxy’s Edge, please consider subscribing.

 

Best of Galaxy's Edge (2014-2014)
Best of Galaxy’s Edge (2014-2014)

Now for Freebies #2 and #3 – Please follow the instructions carefully!

Galaxy’s Edge is celebrating its fourth year in business, and in true Hobbit style, YOU get the presents.

1)  Go to the Phoenix Pick website.

2)  Scroll down a little until you find The Best of Galaxy’s Edge (2013-2014) in the anthologies section.

3)  Click “Publisher’s Direct EPUB” or “Publisher’s Direct MOBI” to put the ebook in your shopping cart.

4)  Enter GE3E (for the EPUB) or GE3M (for the mobi) in the Discount Code box.

5)  Viola!  Free ebook!

6) The eagle-eyed among you may have noticed a pink box at the top of the Phoenix Pick page. That’s a Pay What You Want (including nothing) deal on The Long Tomorrow by Leigh Brackett, plus a cheap three-book bundle featuring more Brackett, Hal Clement, Fred Pohl and others. The bundle isn’t free, but it’s a great deal on some classic SF.

Get four Writers of the Future anthologies for 99 cents each

Here’s the Writers of the Future sale I promised.  Galaxy Press is offering a killer deal on Volumes 26, 27, 28 and 29 of the popular Writers of the Future series.

If you like short fiction and discovering new writers, these are perfect for you. If you’re a writer or illustrator who’s thinking about entering, one of the best ways to learn what the contest likes is to read the anthos.

Here are your links.

Writers of the Future, Vol. 26
Writers of the Future, Vol. 26

 

Writers of the Future, Vol. 27
Writers of the Future, Vol. 27

 

Writers of the Future, Vol. 28
Writers of the Future, Vol. 28

 

Writers of the Future, Vol. 29
Writers of the Future, Vol. 29

 

P.S. I love the cover for V29 because it looks like Mr. Jetpack is standing on a pile of pancakes, one foot firmly planted on either side of the butter.  😀

 

 

 

“Flight of the Kikayon” is live on StarShipSofa!

FotKatStarShipSofaI love all of my stories, but Flight of the Kikayon is one of my favorites. It just went live as a podcast at StarShipSofa!

Kikayon is a sequel to Totaled, set some 200 years after Totaled ends. If you’ve read Totaled, you’ll notice similarities in the character choices, structure and motifs.  (And if you haven’t read Totaled, they’re far enough apart that each one stands alone.)

Whip up your snack or beverage of choice and settle in for a good listen.

This one’s a novelette, so you’ll need about 40 minutes.

P.S. They’re also doing a Patreon thing, and I think they do great work. If you can spare a buck a month, please support them.

Clarkesworld’s Year 3 anthology is just $0.99 on Kindle today

Clarkesworld Year 3
Clarkesworld Year 3

No, I’m not planning to turn my blog into a mini BookBub, but I’ve seen a couple of deals lately that are too good not to share.

If you like Clarkesworld, here’s a whole year’s worth of their stories for just 99 cents. It’s Clarkesworld: Year 3, which translates to 2012 – I think.

I have no clue how long this deal will last, so get it while the getting’s good. Oh, and stay tuned for my next post with four Writers of the Future anthos for 99 cents each.  😉

Dear Puppies: Please talk about what you love

Hey, Puppies,

Can we talk?

I’ve been watching this Hugo thing unfold with an ever-growing sense of disquiet. A lot of people are angry right now, and the anger isn’t helping anyone. In fact, it’s hurting people all over fandom, no matter where they stand on the Hugos.

Sometimes anger is productive, but I haven’t seen anything remotely productive out of this yet, so maybe it’s time to start talking about books.

“Oh, so we’re supposed to make nice and sweep it all under the rug?”

No. Talking about books doesn’t sweep anything under the rug. What it does is build common ground, and common ground is that place where productive conversations can eventually happen. Anger and more anger just makes everyone defensive. Doors slam, walls go up and people become more insular, not less.

“Why us, Kary? Why do we have to go first?”  Because there’s a lot of our stuff on the ballot.

If you love it so much that you nominated it, it’s time to tell the world about it. Which is your favorite, Dark Between the Stars or Skin Game, or was it something else entirely? Write a post on why your pick is so awesome. Put it on your blog, your Tumblr, your Facebook, etc. Heck, put it here as a comment.

Then do the same for your second favorite or something in one of the other categories. If we all do that, the internet will be brimming with book recommendations instead of outrage, which, frankly, would make it a much nicer place to be than it is now.

“But they started it!” At some point, it doesn’t matter who started it.

You know what started it? Books started it. Stories we love, by authors we love. Middle Earth. Ringworld. Westeros. Gotham City. That’s what started it. Mary Shelley. H.G. Wells. Jules Verne. They started it, too.

So let’s take a page from the Dread Pirate Roberts. Let’s put down our swords and rocks and talk about books like the genre intended.

 

SALE: The Best of Galaxy’s Edge is $0.99 for a short time only!

The Best of Galaxy’s Edge, edited by Mike Resnick

My publisher is offering a sale today!

Get The Best of Galaxy’s Edge, packed with 25 great stories including my Hugo nominee, Totaled, for just 99 cents.

Well, what are you waiting for?  😀

ETA: As of Thursday, 4/30, the sale is still going on. Grab it if you want it because I’m not sure how long the promo price will last.

ETA 2: Writers of the Future, Volume 29 (not the current one) is also on sale for 99 cents.

Free mini eARC for #WOTF31! Who wants one?

Hi, all!

In the next day or so, I will have a mini eARC for volume 31 of Writers of the Future to distribute to anyone who is willing to leave an honest review on launch day (or thereabouts).

Here are the deets:

Writers of the Future, Vol. 31
  • The mini eARC (PDF) will only have three or four of the stories in it. If you want to read them all, look for the mini eARCs being offered by some of my co-authors. Gotta catch ’em all!
  • The launch is scheduled for May the 4th. May the Fourth be with you!  How awesome is that?
  • In your review, it’s fine to mention that you haven’t read all of the stories, and please do mention that you received a free sample copy.
  • If you want one, please say so in the comments. Once I’ve got the file, I’ll send it to the email address used for your comment. (In other words, don’t post your email in the comment itself. I can see it in the admin interface.)
  • If I get a lot of requests, please give me a day or two to get back to you.
  • If you buy the paper copy and we ever meet at a con or workshop (*ahem* Sasquan), I will be happy to sign it for you!
Oh, and here’s a plug for my story, POSEIDON’S EYES.
In a sleepy California beach town, spirits magnify both the good and the evil in human hearts.

Many thanks!

Kary

ETA: I’ve also got two 99 cent sales for you!  Mike Resnick’s Best of Galaxy’s Edge has 25 short stories in it, including my Hugo nominee, and Writers of the Future, Volume 29 (not the current volume) is also on sale. Grab them fast because I don’t know how long the sales will last.

Reminder: Comments are moderated, and may not appear in a timely fashion if I’m busy writing or away from my computer.

On discovering SFF and becoming a fan

Challenge accepted, Mr. Torgersen!

My very first crush was on Astro Boy, shortly followed by Speed Racer, shortly followed by Mr. Spock and Cmdr. Sulu. I should note that I was four when Astro Boy and Speed Racer stole my heart, and five when I discovered Star Trek.

By age six, my love of Star Trek got me into my first fannish fight. See, there were these boys in my first grade class who kept calling it “Star TRACK.” 😉 (Yes, I was *that* girl.)

The Wizard of Oz was another favorite, and my friends and I played elaborate WoO make-believe on the playground. We were all faeries, you see, like Glinda, in the service of Mother Nature. There were also Bad Faeries who served Bad Mother Nature, and the idea for both Mother Natures came from a margarine commercial.

We traveled in bubbles, of course, and the first rule of the game was that you had to describe your bubble, then your dress.  (This was before the Princessification of Everything, so Glinda was as close as we got.) After that, the Good Faeries set about foiling the schemes of the Bad Faeries, and someone usually pretended to be a kitten before the game was over, which totally worked because rescuing kittens was *totally* a Good Faerie thing to do.

I still loved Star Trek, but I hadn’t yet discovered readable SFF. Maybe we didn’t have any in my small school library? Or I guess I had, since I’d read the Narnia and Wizard of Oz books, but I hadn’t mentally separated SFF from the folk tales and fairy tales that formed the bulk of my reading.

That all changed when we moved in the 4th grade. New school, new library. I was ahead of my new classmates in a couple of subjects, so the teacher excused me to the library. I knew I liked big fat books, so I made most of my selections by the width of the spine. Witch of the Glens was awesome. So was The Witch of Blackbird Pond. Then I found this odd book called The Hobbit. What the heck was a Hobbit?

After that, my SFF reading exploded. My mother was a jr. high English teacher, and she added Podkayne of Mars and Anne McCaffrey’s Dragonsong to the likes of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and When the Legends Die. I stole her teacher copies and read them under my covers at night with a flashlight. Then I read everything else by those authors I could get my hands on.

At 16, I went to Brazil for a year, and my luggage limits only permitted me a few books. I took Patricia McKillip’s Riddlemaster of Hed series and about four Xanth books. I was deep in the interior, so books in English were rare as hen’s teeth, but I found Out of the Silent Planet in the private library of some American Benedectine nuns. About six months in, I could read well enough to buy Portuguese books, so I read Clifford Simak’s Irmandade do Talisman (Fellowship of the Talisman) and Heinlein’s Friday in Portuguese.

I’d started writing by then, too. Star Wars fan fiction, though it wasn’t called fanfic back then. See, I’d just seen Empire, and there was no way I was going to wait a WHOLE YEAR for the next movie, so I wrote an entire sequel, longhand, in pencil, in a spiral notebook. (I still have it, btw.) I also wrote lots of prologues. The best books had them, so clearly if I wanted to be a writer, I had to master the art of the prologue, right? Right?!?

The first writer I ever tried to imitate was Roger Zelazny, because Amber.

tl:dr?  I was hooked on Star Trek by the age of 5, then discovered Big, Fat Fantasy (TM) thanks to Tolkien in 4th grade.